These are trees on my walk to work at the hand tool school. Beech, oak, cherry, ash, walnut, laurel and rhododendron line the road all the way. Limbs drop and culling provides a reasonable supply of small stock and next weekend (2-3 April 2011) we begin our Discovering Woodworking workshop in the best place for discovering woodworking, which is in these woods.  Join us on the blog for daily updates and uptakes of questions.

Many if not most woodworkers spend no time considering the trees from which we source our wood. Magazine writers and editors, tool makers, machine makers and suppliers and woodworking catalogues have no association with the forest floor and the woodlands  yet we depend on their knowledge to enlighten us as to what tools, machines and equipment we need to work wood. So, anyway, I think this to be a good place to at least look at and meditate on our ongoing dependency on this amazing resource.

We will be looking at some important stuff that most modern-day woodworkers know nothing about. It’s fast paced I admit. We have a lot to get through to lay the foundation, but it will encourage and inspire them in dozens of ways to reconsider both how and why they work wood and introduce them to methods they never dreamed possible at all.

Most people now live in a culture that has shifted to the point that they no longer even know a furniture maker, split wood gathered for firewood from the woods or has any engagement in real woodworking.

See you next weekend!

  • Hasan on Imagine…those carved pieces are very beautiful. It's almost unbelievable that they can be done with hand. I seem to never understand how one is made. Is there a video or a book so one can…
  • Thomas Olson on Sharp TalkingI also love to sharpen. One of the greatest ways I know to relax.
  • Dennis Sheehan on Sharp TalkingAs a plumber I drilled or cut many round holes usually anywhere from 1/2” through 8” and the benefit of a sharp bit and new worm was self evident at the end of the day . The master…
  • Joe on Sharp TalkingThanks Paul. I followed your advice regarding diamond stones. Have my three and have never looked back. They work well and I'm blissfully ignorant of any other way and happy to rem…
  • Patrick Sadr on Sharp Talking"I do use a coarse abrasive, cloth-backed, to reestablish a damaged bevel and so on, or if I have gone out of square." Paul could you please go on about this? I do vaguely remember…
  • Brandon Wilson on Sharp TalkingPaul: *is an expert and a Sellers and talks about sharpening* Also Paul: *complains when "expert sellers" talk about sharpening* (yes, I know I'm not the first and probably won't b…
  • Jerry Stark on Sharp TalkingI certainly agree with Paul on this one. The more time I have spent wood working, the more I have realized that it is better to build skills than it is to buy machines. (I could ha…