A weekend project

If you have a weekend free then make this lovely tray. Perhaps you need an additional Christmas gift that will hone your skills at the same time. It has many obvious and not so obvious uses ranging from small tools tray to  pocket dump container or tea-for-two server. I use one for my drawing pencils and a second one for tools like vernier callipers and protractors. I designed it as a simple tray and it has decent joinery for both solidity and skill building.

What more? It is a two-part series that’s free to all woodworking masterclasses subscribers. So if you haven’t yet  signed up for our FREE subscription membership then sign up here and enjoy this and many a dozen other skill-building videos showing projects, techniques, methods of work and so much more!

 

7 Comments

  1. nemo on 30 November 2018 at 3:48 pm

    Well I’ll be…

    Yesterday evening I scrounged around in the attic to find a small tray to put electronics measurement probes in (like planes, they seem to breed) on the electronics bench/desk, as it was time to tidy things up a bit. I did find a plastic tray that I put to use, whilst thinking that I should make a nice wooden one of the correct size.

    The next day I visit your blog and what do you know…. I’m not exaggerating when I say my jaw dropped.



    • Max™ on 30 November 2018 at 11:05 pm

      (He’s watching you, don’t react, for all you know he could be there in the room as you read this, planing corners down flush, refitting your mortises, doving your tails!)



  2. Glenn Dube on 30 November 2018 at 9:26 pm

    Nice design. looking around for an excuse to make some of these in different sizes



  3. Dave Alvarez on 3 December 2018 at 1:44 pm

    I love your blog, Paul. It reinforces the correctness of my decision to ‘adopt’ you as my long distance woodworking instructor. When I originally learned woodworking I too was taught by others; you had your George, and like wise I had my Arnold and (after he was hurt at work and decided to drop cabinet making) my Charles. Unfortunately, they were never able to teach me hand woodworking (because I was living and working in the US where woodworking apprenticeships don’t exist) but they did teach the finer points of working with machines; all the jigs and guides and finer points of mechanical routers, table saw, etc. But as they were doing so, they would also speak of very many other things, and of life in general, and this is what your blog reminds me of. It underline the fact that none of us are solely woodworkers, or any other sorts of workers; we are human beings attached to those hands and eyes and minds. And Arnold and Charles, and now you, are definitely living up to that tradition. I eagerly await part 2 of your tray build, even though it probably won’t be ready before Xmas. I still have a lot of hand woodworking to learn.



    • Paul Sellers on 3 December 2018 at 3:34 pm

      Episode II goes out on Friday so I hope that this does give you time before Christmas, Dave.



  4. Gene on 3 December 2018 at 8:54 pm

    Thanks Mr. Sellers…….will get on that before Christmas..You have a wonderful holiday…..



  5. Sean on 7 December 2018 at 8:58 am

    Hi,

    I can’t see anything else for this project – apart from the photos above. I get the emails which I thought meant I’m subscribed. Is there something else I need to do?

    Thanks
    Sean



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