My Samson No 0 made by John Hall Here is the joiner’s axe (UK spelling). It’s perfectly shaped in every way and it’s mine. A joiner’s axe is not a green axe or a carving axe but it carves and shapes wood as well in most cases too. It’s not a felling axe because of its […]

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Shaping axes and scrapers for spoon making and carving Shaping an axe to carve with is necessary because they really don’t come fit for purpose usually. Today we do the axe. Later the scraper. Here you see two axe types. One is large the other small. The one below is an old and well-used […]

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Most axes I’ve seen others use and picked up have rarely been sharp. Do I judge by this? I suppose I do if it’s a joiner’s axe and not a kindling axe or a felling axe. Joiner’s axes are working edges mostly and sharpened to the same level as a chisel or a plane. […]

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I think this is the last one at this point. The joiner’s axe split cuts all manner of joinery and may seem old fashioned and especially so to today’s carpenter-joiner. Even though I am a furniture maker I knew many furniture makers who never hesitated to pull out an axe to advance their work. This […]

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[…] the opposite end. Use the chisel bevel up for convex runs around the bowl area. Start shallow… …and the follow the line, parallel to the carved bowl. Axe-cut method Don’t underestimate the value of the axe in general woodworking. Few tools parallel its versatility, but obviously there are inherent dangers that should not be […]

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[…] carvers often have what appear to be the same tools with different shapes on or behind the cutting edges to their carving tools. It’s the same with axes. When you do find an axe you like you will most likely use it and adapt it to different tasks. Then again, there are tasks that […]

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Mesquite restrains my falling axe tight within its wet jaw And wedged there it waits, gripped in stubbornness. I catch my breath; the axe waits more ‘neath fingers traced Along the hickory helm smoothed by yet another coarse and sweat-filled hand A second swift, falling cut bites deep within the mesquite Chips, nay chunks […]

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[…] the log for two spoon blanks  For this first spoon I used a split section about 4” diameter. One log I split in the UK with an axe, in the US I used a similar section of yellow birch and split a natural shake using an oak wedge. Oak wedge or axe, both work. […]

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[…] spoons at the bench hybridising woodcraft with bench-craft is now watchable on YouTube. I enjoyed doing this video and the previous one on making spoons with the axe and knife. I still used an axe for some of the work but showed a variety of different techniques many if not most spoon makers never […]

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How do you sharpen an axe? Sharpening an axe for carving and shaping What is your preferred shape for an axe? Shaping your axes for carving For relevant blog posts, click here

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