I hope that by now you can string these posts together and discover that your workspace has critical elements that go beyond the sterile kitcheny look depicted in most magazines and videos. I’ve made it clear that orderliness is important and having a place for everything means it and you have a sense of belonging. The maxim ”

Everything has a place and everything in its place.” is sound advise for any craftsman and inevitably that’s how it works best, but ultimately it all comes down to self discipline and that’s important to any craft worker.

Environmentally, your space soon gets gobbled up when you involve others in the same workshop. I love having others in my work place, but I keep them at arms length in my work space. Every craftsman should have an invisible comfort zone (a bit like standing in a queue) (line in US) when working permanently in a workshop, so if there are ten craftsmen in a workshop, the boss should first provide that place or sphere of occupation, and then allow that creative space to develop into a zone of working comfort. Only then will creativity flow to and from the craftsman (this includes  craftsmen-in-training) in his work.

I think harmony is a generated entity in work environments that evolve from creating order in the place you work. By the degree of care any artisan has for the space he works in, the tools used to work with, the people around him and the material he brings shape to and works into pieces of creative art and order, evolves the comfort in work.

These legs have a harmony to them not only destined in the finished piece they will under gird, but more so simply lying in wait on the window cill. Seldom do we consider peace amongst the noise of work, but it’s an essential ingredient that comes through a creative sphere of fulfilment generally limited by various physical limitations.

  • Carlos Alvarado on Happy Birthday Paul!I hope that you have a very Happy and prosperous coming year and that yo enjoy your birthday. I also want to thank you for all your help and inspiration. Really enjoy the way you t…
  • Robert Lenart on Happy Birthday Paul!Happy birthday Paul, and many more to follow. I’ll be 71 on the 6th of February. I found your blog about three months ago and haven’t missed a day since. Your inspiration and infor…
  • Dominik Große-Schulte on Happy Birthday Paul!Happy birthday Paul, And thank you so much for teaching us so much. I never dreamed that working with my hands could be so fulfilling. Love your work Dominik from Germany
  • Chris Terrell on Happy Birthday Paul!Happy Birthday Paul and very best wishes to you, your family and your team. You do inspiring work and I've learned a lot of useful things from your blog, youtube etc . I wish I'd m…
  • DaveO on Happy Birthday Paul!Happy Birthday Paul! May you have a blessed year.
  • Kurt Barensfeld on Happy Birthday Paul!Happy Birthday,Paul. I wish you had been around in 1973 when I started to do woodworking in NYC. My information came from English woodworking books and where does one find “deal” i…
  • Martin Jukes on Happy Birthday Paul!Happy Birthday Paul thank you for all your hard work and long may you reign