I hope that by now you can string these posts together and discover that your workspace has critical elements that go beyond the sterile kitcheny look depicted in most magazines and videos. I’ve made it clear that orderliness is important and having a place for everything means it and you have a sense of belonging. The maxim ”

Everything has a place and everything in its place.” is sound advise for any craftsman and inevitably that’s how it works best, but ultimately it all comes down to self discipline and that’s important to any craft worker.

Environmentally, your space soon gets gobbled up when you involve others in the same workshop. I love having others in my work place, but I keep them at arms length in my work space. Every craftsman should have an invisible comfort zone (a bit like standing in a queue) (line in US) when working permanently in a workshop, so if there are ten craftsmen in a workshop, the boss should first provide that place or sphere of occupation, and then allow that creative space to develop into a zone of working comfort. Only then will creativity flow to and from the craftsman (this includes  craftsmen-in-training) in his work.

I think harmony is a generated entity in work environments that evolve from creating order in the place you work. By the degree of care any artisan has for the space he works in, the tools used to work with, the people around him and the material he brings shape to and works into pieces of creative art and order, evolves the comfort in work.

These legs have a harmony to them not only destined in the finished piece they will under gird, but more so simply lying in wait on the window cill. Seldom do we consider peace amongst the noise of work, but it’s an essential ingredient that comes through a creative sphere of fulfilment generally limited by various physical limitations.

  • Thomas on Plywood Workbench AnniversaryThank you! that's a good idea :-)
  • Paul Sellers on It’s All in the JoineryThe main reason never to hollow grind though is one) the general and unnecessary excessive loss of steel, two) overheating the steel and even burning it, three) the need of some ki…
  • Mark D. Baker on If You Need a ReasonFor about 40 years, I was involved in heavy construction. I gauged my work effort by my food consumption and weight each Monday morning and the following Friday. Each Monday, if my…
  • Ed on It’s All in the JoineryI think they hollow grind because A) New tools are almost universally thick blades, often cryogenically hardened B) They believe that the only way to have a sharp edge is from the…
  • JOe on If You Need a ReasonYou raise a good point Paul about physical labor. I faced a dilemma back in the late 1990s. I had finished my schooling and moved back home to start my career. My grandmother lived…
  • Joe on Furniture For Your HomeThanks Paul. Looking forward to it all. Any chance you can give us a vlog walkthrough on the ideas bouncing around in your head? I'm not trying to get you to commit to anything but…
  • Ed on It’s All in the JoineryWilliam Nenna, yes, this is what I mean by them sharpening differently. If you buy a grinder, hollow grind, etc., there's no issue. If you use water stones and a jig, there may als…