It’s often hard to describe how the end of a training intensive feels. I work about 12-14 hours a day most days to ensure its success. This has been another wonderful month-long class and today was something of a last day. The day culminated with loading up chairs, tables and toolboxes handmade throughout the month.  They also took home a load of working knowledge,

new friends and memories they will never forget. If we could can it we would but this kind of experience is paid for by the doing of it. They all took a risk in different measure and in different ways. Two of them may not have jobs when they return home because they were not technically entitled to the long period off of work. Some worked evenings to fulfil obligations and others worked the whole day in different ways.

Joe was a great fellow and in his ambitions he took a month out from his dissertation to attend. he did work outside of class time to keep up with his University work.

I think that it’s always neat to see people pushing that final push to complete their work. There is something that they must risk every step of the ay and it’s this that makes it all the more worthwhile.Sabrina left a day early and will come back for the arms and seat.

 

 

 

 

Caleb didn’t glue his up but held it all together with pallet wrap (shrink wrap US) ready for shipping back to Texas. It was great having him here in the UK and also his wife and the little ones.

 

Rhodri managed to fit his rockers on today and so too Joe. I think they both had a blast.

Gerald finished off some work on his tool box today and also finished his coffee table. Some of the guys had to leave early but they will come back for a couple of days next week to finish off.

 

 

 

Phil was a great help as I have already said. Everyone liked the new Legacy Team of myself, Joseph, Caleb and Phil. They were all very great help.

The class was more than sufficient for me. I felt fulfilled and rewarded for my work, as I always do. In one month these friends have become truly knowledgeable about their craft and that’s the success of our Real Woodworking Campaign, which places emphasis on around-the-bench hands-on training. So inspiring.

  • Hasan on Imagine…those carved pieces are very beautiful. It's almost unbelievable that they can be done with hand. I seem to never understand how one is made. Is there a video or a book so one can…
  • Thomas Olson on Sharp TalkingI also love to sharpen. One of the greatest ways I know to relax.
  • Dennis Sheehan on Sharp TalkingAs a plumber I drilled or cut many round holes usually anywhere from 1/2” through 8” and the benefit of a sharp bit and new worm was self evident at the end of the day . The master…
  • Joe on Sharp TalkingThanks Paul. I followed your advice regarding diamond stones. Have my three and have never looked back. They work well and I'm blissfully ignorant of any other way and happy to rem…
  • Patrick Sadr on Sharp Talking"I do use a coarse abrasive, cloth-backed, to reestablish a damaged bevel and so on, or if I have gone out of square." Paul could you please go on about this? I do vaguely remember…
  • Brandon Wilson on Sharp TalkingPaul: *is an expert and a Sellers and talks about sharpening* Also Paul: *complains when "expert sellers" talk about sharpening* (yes, I know I'm not the first and probably won't b…
  • Jerry Stark on Sharp TalkingI certainly agree with Paul on this one. The more time I have spent wood working, the more I have realized that it is better to build skills than it is to buy machines. (I could ha…