For more information on the Router Plane, see our beginner site Common Woodworking.

I have used this little hand router for many years. It replaced my old Stanley router #271 as it’s slightly larger than the Stanley model and finely made as is the standard for Veritas Tools. This one has no fine adjustment mechanism and it’s not really necessary because quite, simply, it’s much simpler to move it with your fingers. Though I love and use this router plane regularly, there is a small design flaw that can thankfully be fixed with a flat file in seconds:

The flaw is irksome in that two things can go wrong at the same time if you don’t remedy the problem and they go wrong when you least want them to happen. Tightening a knurled knob sets the depth of cut and also secures the cutting iron stem. Because the stem is round and goes into a round hole, the cutter often turns in the housing dado as you press and advance the router into the cut. This pressure doesn’t have to be that forceful. The twist is disturbing. The second element is less obvious. Because it’s difficult to get sufficient pressure on the knurled knob, and its a round stem in a round hole, pushing the router into the wood sometimes causes the foot of the cutter to pull out more than the original set position. I believe that this is because the single-sided upper bevel naturally forces the blade down, but the plane sole should normally prevent this action. In this case, the round bar struggles in the round hole because of a lack of friction.

Correcting the flaw

I used a flat file to file to adjacent flats on the back of the round stem. The steel is mild so it files easily. The cast upstand of the  body of the plane has a squared channel that will accept the retro-filed stem cutter. The two flats don’t have to be very wide and its surprising how rigid the cutter is after making this small remedial step.

  • D.J. Quigley on A Future PastMr. Joe Renta on 28 September 2020 at 7:01 pm got to it first. That is a damned fine rocking chair. Certainly a worthy project if it would be practical.
  • Terrence OBrien on A Future PastStaircases? My initial interest in hand woodworking came from a staircase in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Google "Loretto Stairs." It's easier than trying to explain the stairs. They are…
  • Steve P on A Few Years AgoI was planning on making the small dutch toolchest for travel but i really like this one. I 3rd the WWMC
  • Jeff D on A Future PastIt is nuts that some woods can last centuries in the open air without a synthetic preservative. I went to a state park the other day, maybe yesterday. I saw one of the oldest build…
  • Roger Browning on A Future PastPaul thanks for who you are and what you do. Now for the Texans and that splinter that gets bigger from one side of Texas to the other. Everything is bigger in Texas. When my Texas…
  • Jeff D on A Future PastThe boxwood rule comment slayed me!
  • John on Woodworking BudgetingHi Paul, I’ve been following your UTube videos for months. I’m starting to collect hardware to build your work bench. Recently came across a bench vise in an antique shop that must…