As we come to the close of the year 2011 there is a sense of new beginnings beyond its close. I can look to the past for wisdom and guidance, but anticipation always reaches in expectation for future development. Closing one year filled with life, knowledge, memories, achievements and developments somehow pales in the face an unknown future, yet we look as always ahead.

This past year we have continued building on two decades spent reviving real and substantive skills we almost lost in woodworking and achieved a return to the simplicity in work and working wood that I think has real value and depth. Your mega response to the work of New Legacy on every front has been inspiring to me and my fellow woodworkers and so too the Real Woodworking Campaign. Please continue signing in for the RWC. It will have real value for woodworkers on a global basis as we develop our plans to form chapters and guilds for training woodworkers following a different paradigm. Small beginnings should never be despised and I hope for a future generation preserved in the practice of real work with real wood and real cottage workshops everywhere.

I will be back in New York for several weeks both with the Woodworking Shows and New Legacy USA in January and February and look forward to meeting as many of you as I can. I hope to continue the Real Woodworking Campaign minute by minute throughout my time there with friends. Please look me up if you are at the shows and keep your questions coming in if you need help in working wood.

The Woodworker magazine I write regularly for is carrying a current  article and I just sent in the final draft I wrote on Emerging Artisans for the February issue out in early January 2012. I think t will be interesting to read of the lives of two young craftsmen I see emerging marvellously as masters in their craft

I will continue posting through the Holiday season and on into New York

  • Jonathan Hayhurst on Autism Support in WoodworkingJust wanted to say thank for what you do and your new project. I am a father of an autistic toddler. Hand tools allow her to be in the shop and share in the experience with me. She…
  • Paul Sellers on Hall Hat, Coat & Shoe StandIt is indeed.Did you see the baby cots we built a year ago. Five dismantlable panels as per tradition but so robust I am expecting my great grandchildren, and my great, great, gran…
  • Jay on Hall Hat, Coat & Shoe StandIf heirloom is being passed from generation to generation, then flat-pack does not disqualify a piece. About 45 years ago my uncle, a "finish carpenter" here in the U.S., made a ba…
  • Anthony on Hall Hat, Coat & Shoe StandOh boy, I imagine the trolls will be along shortly with their "purist" rhetoric. Bless you, Paul, for being able to weather those storms. I'm looking forward to projects like this.…
  • Paul Sellers on Diminishing Craft ValueOh, I know there are all kinds of reasons for not encouraging any craft work of any kind and not the least of which is something commonly called 'progress'. It's what's being dismi…
  • Matt Bourland on Diminishing Craft ValueThe issue with schools is that they only have so much time. They focus on what is the comming techno land what they can tech the student to be able to join the work force and get a…
  • nemo on Hall Hat, Coat & Shoe StandTorsion boxes and honeycomb-structures are very common in the aircraft industry. Strong, rigid and light-weight. I've held stair-treads that were made that way in my hand that weig…