As we come to the close of the year 2011 there is a sense of new beginnings beyond its close. I can look to the past for wisdom and guidance, but anticipation always reaches in expectation for future development. Closing one year filled with life, knowledge, memories, achievements and developments somehow pales in the face an unknown future, yet we look as always ahead.

This past year we have continued building on two decades spent reviving real and substantive skills we almost lost in woodworking and achieved a return to the simplicity in work and working wood that I think has real value and depth. Your mega response to the work of New Legacy on every front has been inspiring to me and my fellow woodworkers and so too the Real Woodworking Campaign. Please continue signing in for the RWC. It will have real value for woodworkers on a global basis as we develop our plans to form chapters and guilds for training woodworkers following a different paradigm. Small beginnings should never be despised and I hope for a future generation preserved in the practice of real work with real wood and real cottage workshops everywhere.

I will be back in New York for several weeks both with the Woodworking Shows and New Legacy USA in January and February and look forward to meeting as many of you as I can. I hope to continue the Real Woodworking Campaign minute by minute throughout my time there with friends. Please look me up if you are at the shows and keep your questions coming in if you need help in working wood.

The Woodworker magazine I write regularly for is carrying a current  article and I just sent in the final draft I wrote on Emerging Artisans for the February issue out in early January 2012. I think t will be interesting to read of the lives of two young craftsmen I see emerging marvellously as masters in their craft

I will continue posting through the Holiday season and on into New York

  • D.J. Quigley on A Future PastMr. Joe Renta on 28 September 2020 at 7:01 pm got to it first. That is a damned fine rocking chair. Certainly a worthy project if it would be practical.
  • Terrence OBrien on A Future PastStaircases? My initial interest in hand woodworking came from a staircase in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Google "Loretto Stairs." It's easier than trying to explain the stairs. They are…
  • Steve P on A Few Years AgoI was planning on making the small dutch toolchest for travel but i really like this one. I 3rd the WWMC
  • Jeff D on A Future PastIt is nuts that some woods can last centuries in the open air without a synthetic preservative. I went to a state park the other day, maybe yesterday. I saw one of the oldest build…
  • Roger Browning on A Future PastPaul thanks for who you are and what you do. Now for the Texans and that splinter that gets bigger from one side of Texas to the other. Everything is bigger in Texas. When my Texas…
  • Jeff D on A Future PastThe boxwood rule comment slayed me!
  • John on Woodworking BudgetingHi Paul, I’ve been following your UTube videos for months. I’m starting to collect hardware to build your work bench. Recently came across a bench vise in an antique shop that must…