DSC_0201I really had a fun few days making more films for YouTube followers who want to see and hear technique.

I cannot emphasise the wellbeing I get from spending time in the woods and actually working there when I can. Few crafts give this much pleasure and walking out with a stool a chair or a wooden spoon gives memories that last a lifetime simply because this way of working touches all of the senses. Handwork in craft is always high demand in this way. There is no substitute for it and everyone I ever met that did this for the first time said “it was life enriching, life changing and long lasting.”

I hope you enjoy this one half as  much as I did. We have a follow up video using some of these methods and combining them with some of my own that bring a different dynamic to the sphere of spoon carving.

8 Comments

  1. Pete on 6 September 2013 at 8:31 pm

    Youtube says the video is private.



  2. George Bridgeman on 6 September 2013 at 8:50 pm

    All I can see is “This video is private.” 🙁

    George.



    • Paul Sellers on 6 September 2013 at 11:22 pm

      Yes, It’s open now.



  3. Brandon Avakian on 6 September 2013 at 11:48 pm

    Wonderful video Paul. Thank you.



  4. David on 7 September 2013 at 11:54 am

    Nice one Paul. Enjoyed that . Perhaps you should do survey now to determine average number of fingers per member now and another one in 6 months time lol



  5. Steve Massie on 7 September 2013 at 3:51 pm

    Paul I enjoyed the video very much and am anxious to start making spoons. My Grandson actually watched it with me ( he will be 7 ) thought it was cool LOL. Thank You for your very generous efforts.

    Steve



  6. David Kuhns on 8 September 2013 at 12:37 am

    I’ve been carving spoons from cherry for the last few months.



  7. Sean Hellman on 8 September 2013 at 1:13 pm

    Paul, how safe do you think that chopping an axe into a block is to keep it safe ? At 2.40 you do this and at 2.53 the axe falls out. I never keep or store and axe like this and have heard of various nasty injuries. It can fall out, hopefully it will just fall onto the ground and not a foot or leg. The nicely honed edge can get damaged. I have also heard of people put knives next to an axe stored like this and when reaching for the knife a finger goes under the heel of the axe and a nasty slicing cut happens. The other thing that happens when storing axes like this is that bits of wood from the end grain wood block can stick to the axe near the edge and then can cause a glancing blow of the axe. Also please when starting out make sure your block is is stable and does not move around. A stable surface to work on is a must.



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