Now that we have completed the spoon making we can look at saw horses and the traditions of a pair I have made since I was about 16 years old. The joints connecting the legs to the cross beam seems a complexity because the seating is of course compound, but the process is simple if you don’t think too much about it. Pine works really for this type of workshop aid well because of its lightweight portability and strength. Spruce, fir and other softwoods work well, but redwood pine is perfect.

Certain pieces come to mind from my apprentice work as a boy. Alongside saw horses are sack trucks and tool boxes of different types and sizes. Saw horses and stools were temporary work supports. I like to have two heights and two or three sets. Taller ones for tables or stacking materials on are accompanied by a flat bard of 3/4” plywood or some planks.

My saw horses are made from some 1 1/2” stock, but almost any wood from 1 1/4” to 2” thick and 3” to 4” wide will work. More to follow!

3 Comments

  1. Martyn Chick on 25 September 2013 at 8:17 am

    Thanks Paul! Can’t wait for this one.



  2. Paul Sellers on 11 December 2013 at 10:32 am

    Here is another video we plan on releasing soon. via woodworkingmasterclasses.com videos.



  3. tom on 1 December 2016 at 2:12 am

    I few years ago I did try to make a saw horse and I wasn’t quite satisfied with the result. Yours looks better so good work on that! You have a very nice website here with some good informations about woodworking projects. Keep up the good work!



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