The recent blog I did on making spoons at the bench hybridising woodcraft with bench-craft is now watchable on YouTube. I enjoyed doing this video and the previous one on making spoons with the axe and knife. I still used an axe for some of the work but showed a variety of different techniques many if not most spoon makers never use to get you thinking about the wood, the different tools you can use that increase the versatility of using hand tools. This is my Real Woodworking Campaign in action. I do hope you enjoy.

6 Comments

  1. Brandon Avakian on 13 September 2013 at 1:13 am

    Paul,

    I have always loved your passion for woodworking. Your videos are always so well done because your passion for what you are doing shines through.



  2. mark d on 13 September 2013 at 8:57 am

    What a great idea! Would be good to know the answer to this. I’m guessing its possible as only the teeth have been hardened, and the rest of the saw is the right thickness to get flex out of. Ooo going to give it a try at the weekend now 🙂



  3. Steve Massie on 13 September 2013 at 5:32 pm

    I also really enjoyed the video Paul and enjoy your way of working wood very much. I think making spoons is going to be really fun and this will be fun for my 6 1/2 old Grandson as well.

    Thanks again for sharing your knowledge and experience.

    Steve



    • jmpurser on 16 September 2013 at 5:36 pm

      Jennie’s 5 year old grandson is already asking when we can start building bird houses on the “new bench”. His little brother’s motto at 3 years old is “Let’s DO that!” so I think he’ll be just as anxious to make things.



  4. pbates on 27 September 2013 at 8:03 pm

    Paul do you use some kind of oil like sesame oil on your spoons?
    Thanks
    Pete



    • Paul Sellers on 27 September 2013 at 11:06 pm

      You can use vegetable oil, mineral oil or salad bowl oil. Some people say that veg oil goes rancid but I have never had that happen. Canola oil works fine too. I think mineral oil is the most commonly used. It is totally unnecessary to use any oil except for appearance.



  • Don Hummer on If You Need a ReasonWorking as a framing carpenter in high production work in Arizona built my strength and endurance. My brother in law was a gym rat. I had to pour some concrete at his house for a s…
  • Thomas on Plywood Workbench AnniversaryThank you! that's a good idea :-)
  • Paul Sellers on It’s All in the JoineryThe main reason never to hollow grind though is one) the general and unnecessary excessive loss of steel, two) overheating the steel and even burning it, three) the need of some ki…
  • Mark D. Baker on If You Need a ReasonFor about 40 years, I was involved in heavy construction. I gauged my work effort by my food consumption and weight each Monday morning and the following Friday. Each Monday, if my…
  • Ed on It’s All in the JoineryI think they hollow grind because A) New tools are almost universally thick blades, often cryogenically hardened B) They believe that the only way to have a sharp edge is from the…
  • JOe on If You Need a ReasonYou raise a good point Paul about physical labor. I faced a dilemma back in the late 1990s. I had finished my schooling and moved back home to start my career. My grandmother lived…
  • Joe on Furniture For Your HomeThanks Paul. Looking forward to it all. Any chance you can give us a vlog walkthrough on the ideas bouncing around in your head? I'm not trying to get you to commit to anything but…