The recent blog I did on making spoons at the bench hybridising woodcraft with bench-craft is now watchable on YouTube. I enjoyed doing this video and the previous one on making spoons with the axe and knife. I still used an axe for some of the work but showed a variety of different techniques many if not most spoon makers never use to get you thinking about the wood, the different tools you can use that increase the versatility of using hand tools. This is my Real Woodworking Campaign in action. I do hope you enjoy.

6 Comments

  1. Brandon Avakian on 13 September 2013 at 1:13 am

    Paul,

    I have always loved your passion for woodworking. Your videos are always so well done because your passion for what you are doing shines through.



  2. mark d on 13 September 2013 at 8:57 am

    What a great idea! Would be good to know the answer to this. I’m guessing its possible as only the teeth have been hardened, and the rest of the saw is the right thickness to get flex out of. Ooo going to give it a try at the weekend now 🙂



  3. Steve Massie on 13 September 2013 at 5:32 pm

    I also really enjoyed the video Paul and enjoy your way of working wood very much. I think making spoons is going to be really fun and this will be fun for my 6 1/2 old Grandson as well.

    Thanks again for sharing your knowledge and experience.

    Steve



    • jmpurser on 16 September 2013 at 5:36 pm

      Jennie’s 5 year old grandson is already asking when we can start building bird houses on the “new bench”. His little brother’s motto at 3 years old is “Let’s DO that!” so I think he’ll be just as anxious to make things.



  4. pbates on 27 September 2013 at 8:03 pm

    Paul do you use some kind of oil like sesame oil on your spoons?
    Thanks
    Pete



    • Paul Sellers on 27 September 2013 at 11:06 pm

      You can use vegetable oil, mineral oil or salad bowl oil. Some people say that veg oil goes rancid but I have never had that happen. Canola oil works fine too. I think mineral oil is the most commonly used. It is totally unnecessary to use any oil except for appearance.



  • Paul Keane on Working AloneI must say your website is excellent with lots of information on how to work with and improve my wood working skills. Due to the lockdown I have build a workbench, I have been look…
  • Dan on Branching outSteve, was that the one on display inside a ranger station in California? If so, I have seen that as well. Definitely worth a look to anybody interested. Keep well, everybody.
  • Gary on Working AloneYou are not alone when you go home to your partner at the end of each day. The same person you saw when you awoke this-morning. They're even with you in many ways when you're apart…
  • Paul Sellers on Edge Sharpening Under £10Is it "cheap" plates or 'less expensive' or 'low cost' plates? There is a difference here. Mylow cost plates in all gritt=s are holding up well after almost four months to date. My…
  • Paul Sellers on Edge Sharpening Under £10I might suggest something different here. I think that with the larger diamonds to top angular points fracture more readily and in a sense, create a sort of plateaued top which is…
  • Richard C on Edge Sharpening Under £10with the cheap plates, I find that yes, they wear very quickly initially, but then 'settle'. another thing I've found is that it's possible to scratch the grit off completely if yo…
  • Samuel on Working AloneThere’s a childlike joy in only having the bare essentials in tools and knowing them and admiring them.