Though Fibonacci developed his numerical sequence to provide a formula that’s used throughout many mathematical considerations, and mathematicians may enjoy its reality in their work, it also occurs naturally in elements of nature too. The nautilus shell is an example and so too the natural numbering system appears in the arrangement of plant leaves, pinecones, pineapple cones, rose petal arrangements and so much more. The scroll in the violin range of instruments relies on the same system. Though technically not a Fibonacci sequence, I thought you would enjoy what we put together here where we combine the art of woodworking with the art of video craft. Enjoy and share!

 

10 Comments

  1. bill schwegler on 23 March 2017 at 9:54 pm

    I absolutely love the picture of the wood spiral. Can somebody make a print? I absolutely will pay whatever cost to get me a 11×8 photograph of that curly piece of wood.



    • lg kownacki on 24 March 2017 at 1:23 am

      Get out a chisel
      and make your own!



    • Dave on 24 March 2017 at 11:54 am

      Right-mouse-click, Save Image as, Print, Frame.
      (with all the required permissions, of course)



      • phil on 29 March 2017 at 9:49 am

        You can’t do that on a video. You don’t get those options.



  2. Felix Domestica on 24 March 2017 at 12:36 am

    If the photo’s owner gives you permission, there are many services which will produce prints — including canvasses — from an image file. Doing so without that permission would be a copyright violation.



  3. Ferd on 24 March 2017 at 11:44 am

    Design always indicates intelligence. So glad your work indicates the same thing. The image of our Creator is reflected back in what you create & publish. Thank you.



  4. F. Darr on 24 March 2017 at 12:05 pm

    You were absolutely correct; very enjoyable. It’s amazing what beauty there is to see if you just take the time to look.



  5. Espen Lodden on 24 March 2017 at 1:44 pm

    Or even better: Make your own shaving, and frame that, instead of framing a photo of it.



  6. Dan Gaskill on 25 March 2017 at 1:48 am

    See Paul, paring chisels do have a use!
    (Kidding)



  7. Christopher Jones on 26 March 2017 at 5:26 am

    I have always been fascinated by the Fibonacci sequence. The shaving may not fit exactly the Fibonacci sequence, but it still is beautiful. Thank you for the video and I’m so glad I found your blog!



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