In preparation for this blog post I want to suggest some things that will make the task systematically simple and safe to do. This is all before we get into the actual step by step how-to with drawings and images later this week.  I think that it’s important to establish methods readily inclusive for raw…

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Chopping spoons with axes versus other hand tools and vice-versa I think spoon making is one of those remarkably simple woodworking tasks that become even more remarkably simple with the right tools and a good bench. Rarely if ever do I see spoons being made the way I am about to show you in this…

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 Starting out on your own? Start out with spoons A few weeks ago in Penrhyn Castle I split some logs for some spoons. Phil the gardener and groundsman saves culls and limbs for firewood and lets me go through his massive pile when I need something, but I also disappear into the woods on my…

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You may or may not reach a point where you can free-hand a spoon shape straight from the tool. This is not difficult if you can, if you can’t, it can be extremely difficult. It makes little different to the spoon maker in his own home workshop. At shows it often becomes a place to…

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Today I want to take two generally divided worlds of spoon making and unite them. Instead of seeing the axe-cut knife-cut spoon making as a splinter group from the world of woodland crafts, we engage them with other tools like the bow or frame saw, bevel-edged chisel, spokeshave, gouge and scraper; tools more generally associated…

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Try to remember throughout the processes of how we can make spoons that we are interested in investigating areas of woodworking and the goal is not to become a spoon maker unless that’s the limited sphere you want to gain to operate in. Spoon making using these different methods, tools, techniques and so on give…

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The recent blog I did on making spoons at the bench hybridising woodcraft with bench-craft is now watchable on YouTube. I enjoyed doing this video and the previous one on making spoons with the axe and knife. I still used an axe for some of the work but showed a variety of different techniques many…

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It’s hard to say what it’s like to make small collections like this. I have determined that using the gouge to carve a spoon is quicker and easier in general than using say a small spoon scorp or knives. Especially is this so in dry rather than green wood, which most of my spoons were…

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Every so often you get asked to do something that’s just a shade out of the norm or absolutely not the norm. Making spoons is quite normal for me and making 35 is not quite so normal even though I have made thousands of them through the years. My first spoon was made in Texas…

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  • Thomas Olson on Sharp TalkingI also love to sharpen. One of the greatest ways I know to relax.
  • Dennis Sheehan on Sharp TalkingAs a plumber I drilled or cut many round holes usually anywhere from 1/2” through 8” and the benefit of a sharp bit and new worm was self evident at the end of the day . The master…
  • Joe on Sharp TalkingThanks Paul. I followed your advice regarding diamond stones. Have my three and have never looked back. They work well and I'm blissfully ignorant of any other way and happy to rem…
  • Patrick Sadr on Sharp Talking"I do use a coarse abrasive, cloth-backed, to reestablish a damaged bevel and so on, or if I have gone out of square." Paul could you please go on about this? I do vaguely remember…
  • Brandon Wilson on Sharp TalkingPaul: *is an expert and a Sellers and talks about sharpening* Also Paul: *complains when "expert sellers" talk about sharpening* (yes, I know I'm not the first and probably won't b…
  • Jerry Stark on Sharp TalkingI certainly agree with Paul on this one. The more time I have spent wood working, the more I have realized that it is better to build skills than it is to buy machines. (I could ha…
  • Samuel on Sharp TalkingIn relation to sharpening Paul has taught me the word “acuity”