Setting the bullnose plane The # 90 bullnose plane is simple enough to use and setting is simple too. The plane can be used in one of two ways, which I have already mentioned in the first section on the bullnose plane. One is where we use the plane fully assembled and then the other is…

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Essential Woodworking Hand Tools by Paul Sellers Writing my book and indeed seeing it published a few short weeks ago stirred many deep feelings in me. More than almost anything I’ve done in any literature work to date at least. In fact, it impacted me so much I recently went on to complete a companion manuscript I…

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There have been several different types of bullnose plane made through the past century, many more than shown here, and aside from the Veritas version whatever is made today, aside from perhaps the over engineered and prohibitively expensive collector models, generally still follows those made by past makers from the pre early 1900s. There are…

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By now you may well realise that the Stanley #78 moving filletster plane is a useful plane to own and a first choice rebate plane. Unfortunately, because of the missing information, diminished woodworking in schools, diminished use of hand tools generally and then of course machine only exponents who cannot understand why we woodworkers like…

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The Stanley #78 is a plane I have kept turning to for 50 years because of its versatility, compactness and reliable neatness. As with all planes it has unique nuances everyone should learn of but let’s discuss the plane in general first. The filletster plane is simply a rebate or rabbet plane and can be…

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Shoulder planes, rebate planes, filletster planes, bullnose planes, dado planes, carriage maker’s planes , badger planes and others too all create or refine step-downs in the wood to form or refine some type of rebate or housing. What’s the difference and which one should I buy? Some have square mouths and others skewed, while many…

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I made this video for woodworking masterclasses a few months ago for a series we did on making picture frames by hand. I is quick and simple using an old chisel and in a short time you are making rebates (rabbets USA and France) without dust masks, hearing protection and face protection too. Here is…

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  • mark leatherland on Woodworking PatternsHi Paul, wise words. Im trying to develop my own patterns to speed up and improve my woodworking. I don't think that your nearly 400k followers will be looking elsewhere for a new…
  • Thomas Angle on Woodworking PatternsI can think of a few off the top of my head that seem to not master their tools. They do look clumsy and seem a little uncomfortable with them. Of course Paul has and elegance when…
  • Thomas Angle on Resistance to Change"Maybe one day I should publish the list of my own suppliers who have truly served me well" That would be helpful. It seems to be getting harder and harder to find good places to d…
  • Paul Sellers on Woodworking PatternsOne thing I learned and indeed loved about living and working in Texas for half my working life was how many children would address their fathers as Sir and Daddy in the same sente…
  • Hank Edwards on Woodworking PatternsMost everything I had intended to say has been said. Two points remain to be addressed. First to nemo: I work a great deal with translating. English does have a formal structure ak…
  • Jon on Woodworking PatternsYou're not the only one! I've started over from the beginning. The beginning, I think, because I'm not sure. I think the Paul Sellers Blog starts in the spring of 2012, but I'm not…
  • jay gill on Woodworking PatternsI love the integration of pattern and humility! Really got me thinking. A friend once told me that the only difference between a groove, a rut and a grave is depth. I think it's hu…