DSC_0114Christmas in the US starts after Thanksgiving Thursday for the busiest shopping day of the year (USA), but for those of us living around the rest of the globe making gifts and decor begins when we find half a day to do it. To give you a heads-up we made this video for Woodworking Masterclasses last year and thought you might like to see how making beautiful stars from hand-made thin stock can be easily done with dead-on accuracy. These stars make stunning gifts for family trees and table decor too and scraps cost nothing to make them.

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Here is the link to the YouTube video for stars above. I hope that you enjoy this one!

DSC_0029You may also be looking for unique Christmas gift for friends and relatives and the YouTube series on making the wall clock is fun series too, especially at the gift-giving end of it. Here is the link to the first one we did via Woodworking Masterclasses last year.

 

3 Comments

  1. gblogswild on 31 October 2014 at 1:02 pm

    Christmas season started here about three weeks ago. Gets earlier and earlier every year, and today’s just Halloween!



  2. Brian on 6 November 2014 at 1:44 am

    For anyone that is thinking about the star project – quite a few were made last year after the video release and they really are fun to make, take really very little time and you get a wonderful showpiece to give away. Great project for keepsakes for kids, grandkids, or anyone really for my 2 cents.



    • Paul Sellers on 6 November 2014 at 5:46 am

      Just on a health and safety issue here, and thanks Brian, they are fun to make and can be made with children and even for children, but they are not suitable as toys for tots as they are made with small and sharp parts that form the points and angles of the stars. They are very nice for decorating and gift giving though, just think safety first.



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